click to show more information

click to hide/show information About your Search

20121201
20121231
STATION
KQED (PBS) 35
KRCB (PBS) 23
KQEH (PBS) 16
WETA 5
WMPT (PBS) 3
WJZ (CBS) 2
LANGUAGE
English 85
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 85 (some duplicates have been removed)
in the state. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> suarez: and i'm ray suarez. on the newshour tonight, we get the latest on the passage of the right to work laws and the angry demonstrations inside and outside the state capital building. >> woodruff: then, we turn to protests in another part of the world, egypt, where supporters and opponents of president morsi staged rival rallies in cairo four days ahead of vote on a proposed constitution. >> suarez: next in our series of conversations about solving the fiscal crisis, gwen ifill talks with representative allyson schwartz, a democrat from pennsylvania. >> woodruff: we examine an almost $2 billion government settlement with british bank hsbc over charges of money laundering for the nation of iran and mexican drug cartels. >> suarez: jeffrey brown profiles chinese artist and dissident ai wei wei, whose work is on exhibit in the u.s. for the first time. >> if we can change ourselves, that means part of society will change. if more people can do so, then we can change the society. >> woodruff: and we look at what the federal trade commission cal
days ahead of vote on a proposed constitution. >> suarez: next in our series of conversations about solving the fiscal crisis, gwen ifill talks with representative allyson schwartz, a democrat from pennsylvania. >> woodruff: we examine an almost $2 billion government settlement with british bank hsbc over charges of money laundering for the nation of iran and mexican drug cartels. >> suarez: jeffrey brown profiles chinese artist and dissident ai wei wei, whose work is on exhibit in the u.s. for the first time. >> if we can change ourselves, that means part of society will change. if more people can do so, then we can change the society. >> woodruff: and we look at what the federal trade commission calls a "digital danger zone," mobile applications that gather data about children. >> what needs to be done is a way for parents to easily at any time see exactly what's being collected and who they are sharing that information with. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the eng
to children about violence, subjects we address once again tonight. >> warner: then, ray suarez profiles three young immigrants in the u.s. illegally and seeking a reprieve from deportation. >> my values and customs are now american. so, you know, the idea of getting kicked out to korea and never come back to the u.s., i just can't even imagine this >> woodruff: mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> warner: and we examine the growing turmoil in egypt on the eve of a referendum vote on a new constitution. >> one of the major-- has been one between islimus and nonover the future of egypt and the character of the nation >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf. >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. and... >> this program was made possible by t
increases. good evening, i'm jeffrey brown. >> suarez: and i'm ray suarez. on the "newshour" tonight, we sort through the state of play and the latest political maneuvering with congress watcher norman ornstein and political editor christina bellantoni. >> brown: then we look at the suspension of the u.n.'s polio eradication campaign in pakistan, after the killings of nine aid workers. >> suarez: from capitol hill, kwame holman reports on two congressional hearings today where state department officials accepted blame in failing to protect the u.s. diplomatic mission in libya. >> we have to do better. we owe it to our colleagues who lost their lives in benghazi. we owe it to the security professionals who acted with such extraordinary heroism that awful night to try to protect them, and we owe it to thousands of our colleagues serving america with a great dedication every day in diplomatic posts around the world. >> brown: spending versus saving: amid the last-minute holiday rush, paul solman weighs the economic benefits. >> holiday season grand central terminal and a key question: is co
'm judy woodruff. >> suarez: and i'm ray suarez. on the newshour tonight, we have the latest on today's developments, including an update from todd zwillich of public radio international who's been tracking the story on the hill. >> woodruff: then, as secretary of state hillary clinton is hospitalized with a blood clot, we examine their causes and possible treatments. >> suarez: margaret warner talks to jonathan martin and glenn thrush of politico. their new e-book focuses on the crucial final month of the presidential race between barack obama and mitt romney. test. >> barack obama didn't perform that well until late and romney didn't perform the campaign well. campaign management is more important than an individual candidate's performance. >> woodruff: from boston, hari sreenivasan reports on a city- wide effort to keep kids engaged in education through meaningful work experiences. >> we're starting at the very early ages to try to help young people speak. that is a direct relationship to being successful in school and being successful in your life >> woodruff: and we close out 201
blows to the head to long-term damage. we take a look. >> brown: ray suarez looks at the firestorm over israel's announcement it will expand settlements in the west bank. >> ifill: elizabeth brackett looks at how one chicago school is dealing with the transition to new state-wide standards. >> i really did find that the kids do understand more, and they learn more. they're more interested in what they're learning. >> brown: plus, as global carbon dioxide levels hit record highs, we analyze the increasing difficulty of combating climate change, with carol davenport of the "national journal." >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your p
? or is it the key driving economic and moral force in our society? >> suarez: and we close with another in our series of interviews with newly elected congressional members. tonight, north dakota's senator- elect, democrat heidi heitkamp. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the u.s. house of representatives headed toward approval this evening of a tax plan that republicans backed and democrats said was a waste of time. the division demonstrated that efforts to get a bi-partisan agreement and avoid the fiscal cliff are stuck in stalemate. >> the house will b
very much. >> always a pleasure, judy. >> still to come on the newshour >> suarez: still to come on the newshour, causes and treatments for blood clots; a look back at the presidential race; building jobs skills while in high school; the emancipation proclamation; and 2012 in the history books. but first, the other news of the day. here's kwame holman. >> holman: wall street rallied on the final trading day of the year, hoping for a fiscal cliff deal. the dow jones industrial average gained 166 points to close at 13,104, up 7% for the year. the nasdaq rose 59 points to close at 3019, up nearly 16% this year. nearly two dozen people died in a string of attacks across iraq today. most of the violence targeted shiite communities and police. one of the blasts rocked baghdad's karrada neighborhood, sending smoke billowing above the skyline. the car bomb went off near a tent where shiite pilgrims were gathering. five people were killed there. in syria, elite troops, along with tanks, battled to dislodge rebels from a key southern suburb of damascus. the area is within firing distance o
. ray suarez has the latest on the investigation and the reaction in connecticut and beyond. >> ifill: we talk with california senator dianne feinstein, who hopes to revive a law banning assault weapons. >> they aren't hunting weapons. you don't need them for defense. they are military-style weapons and they don't belong in the streets of our city. >> woodruff: we assess the public policy questions raised by the shooting about access to guns, mental health issues, and more. >> ifill: hari sreenivasan reports from newtown on a community in mourning. >> woodruff: and as parents around the country nervously dropped their children off at school today, jeffrey brown talks to a psychiatrist and a school psychologist about what to say and not to say in times of crisis. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st centur
lee and wnyc's todd zwillich. >> woodruff: then, we turn to the shootings in connecticut. ray suarez has our update, as some students return to school and two more families bury their six-year-olds. >> ifill: one lawmaker's change of heart: virginia senator mark warner, an n.r.a. supporter, now says "enough is enough." year from gun violence, if we can cut that number in half, if we can cut that number by 20%, if we can cut that number by 10%, we save thousands of lives. >> woodruff: plus, neighbors and friends in newtown are searching for a way to turn the horror of friday's killings into something positive for their community. hari sreenivasan has our conversation. >> ifill: kira kay reports on an election to watch in india, where the leading candidate for chief minister of one state, narendra modi, is both loved and loathed. >> for all of modi's popularity, he is also one of the most polarizing figures in india today, despised by many for a period of vicious communal violence that happened on his watch. >> woodruff: jeffrey brown remembers the life of war hero and medal of honor w
in a national conversation on what steps should now be taken. ray suarez begins our coverage with this report. >> suarez: a hearse arrived this morning at saint rose of lima catholic church in newtown carrying the body of six-year-old james mattioli, one of the slain first graders from sandy hook elementary school. hours later, a church bell tolled as mourners greeted another small white casket at the funeral for jessica rekos, also six. (bell tolling). meanwhile, students from other local schools returned to class. in buses adorned with ribbons bearing sandy hook's colors, police were on hand as were counselors. >> making the kids safe and happy. that's all we're here for. is to make sure that they are safe and happy. >> suarez: sandy hook itself remains closed. plans call for its students to be sent to a now vacant school in nearby monroe, but it was unclear when. back in washington, a string of democratic members of congress took to the house floor calling for new gun legislation. >> thank you, mr. speaker. we need to pass bold, necessary, overdue gun control legislation. if we do not, thi
of the massacre at an elementary school. ray suarez begins our coverage. >> suarez: flowers streamed into funeral homes around newtown as the shock and horror of friday gave way to grim rituals of grief mourners in black waited under gray skies to attend services for jack pinto and noah, 20 of the... two of the 20 first graders killed at sandy hook elementary. townspeople are still reeling. >> really sad. i didn't want to go back to work today. it hit me hard because i got two kids too. the same age that happened to these kids. it really hit hard, like a parent, like a dad. >> suarez: a somber weekend had concluded with last night's vigil at newtown high school about a mile away from the scene of the killings. ( applause ) police and emergency personnel got a standing ovation as they entered the auditorium. president obama met privately with the victims' families before addressing the shaken crowd. >> i can only hope it helps for you to know that you're not alone in your grief. that our world too has been torn apart, that all across this land of ours we have went with you. we pulled our children
, ray suarez gets two views on proposals to raise the age of eligibility for medicare to 67, from 65. >> woodruff: it's bottoms up tonight for miles o'brien who reports on genetic links to alcoholism and other addictions. >> so far as i know, there's no law against reporting under the influence, so here goes something. while i may carry the genes of an irish pub crawler, my chances of becoming an alcoholic are slightly less. >> warner: and we talk with ambassador marc grossman about prospects for afghanistan as the u.s. prepares to withdraw troops by 2014 and as he leaves his post as u.s. special envoy to the region. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: violence continued across syria today as the united states welcomed a russian admission that syria's rebels may succ
hit. >> brown: then, we turn to india. ray suarez looks at the violent protests and public anger sparked by the gang rape of a young woman. >> warner: john merrow has the story of a group of california charter schools that aim to be the model-ts of education. >> america has lots of terrific schools. people open great schools every year, but they typically open just one. nobody has figured out how to mass produce high quality, cost effective schools. >> brown: we remember general norman schwarzkopf-- the man who commanded american-led forces in the persian gulf war known as "desert storm." >> warner: plus, mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the
caught the government off-guard. ray suarez has more. >> suarez: the fury across india has been building for nearly two weeks, since a 23-year-old medical student was gang-raped and then thrown from this bus in new delhi. sexual assaults are rife in india, especially in new delhi, where, on average, there's a rape reported every 18 hours. but this time, the extreme brutality of the crime ignited outrage that turned violent with street battles between protesters and police. the protests have continued this week, amid growing accusations that police and other officials are dismissive of sex crimes. >> it is completely sad on the part of the government actually since they are doing nothing about the innumerable rape incidents which are happening around us. >> suarez: in response, prime minister manmohan singh announced yesterday the creation of new committees to improve women's safety and expedite assault trials. today he reiterated his government's commitment to justice. >> suarez: six suspects have been arrested in connection with the gang-rape. and last week, india's home minister said t
. >> ifill: ray suarez has a newsmaker interview with secretary of homeland security janet napolitano. >> you can discuss border security and immigration reform simultaneously now. we don't have to this kind of first this and then that. at this point they actually go together. >> woodruff: special correspondent rick karr reports on the polluted waters that spilled into new york homes and businesses in superstorm sandy, raising health concerns. >> everybody sort of got sick at the same time. all of us sort of attributed it to, well, we're all stressed out. it's very cold. but that said, there is a lot of nasty stuff hanging about. >> ifill: and hari sreenivasan has an update on the dangerous working conditions in bangladesh, where more than 100 workers have died over the past month. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. a
is necessary to put armed police officers in every single school in this nation. >> woodruff: and ray suarez talks to mark glaze, director of the pro-gun control advocacy group mayors against illegal guns. >> brown: plus, we hear from high school students from across the country, and gwen ifill talks with secretary of education arne duncan. >> schools have been forever the safe haven, often safest places in the community. and we need to continue to do everything in our power to make sure that they are. >> woodruff: kwame holman updates washington's spending and tax stalemate after house republicans decide not to follow the leader. >> brown: and mark shields and michael gerson analyze the week's news. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf railway. >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations.
care reform law. ray suarez gets an update from julie rovner of npr. from the island of mindanao in the philippines, fred de sam lazaro profiles a group of peacekeepers struggling to maintain a fragile cease-fire between government and rebel forces.o >> there are many other organizations that do medical care and food provisions. never enough. what is new here is civilians protecting civilians. >> ifill: itn's john sparks reports on police officers in china, and their accusations of widespread corruption by local officials. and jeffrey brown samples the poetry about greece's financial woes and its austerity measures. >> we'll hock the person to buy our bread. if you believe the headlines, then we're sunk. greece downgraded deeper into junk. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour.n >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 85 (some duplicates have been removed)